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Home September 11-12 2014 - Edinburgh

Track 1

Deming Room

  • 7:30 - 08:50
    Adam Yuret 
    Lean Coffee 
  • 8:50 - 09:00
    Chris McDermott 
    Welcome 
  • 9:00 - 10:00
    Keynote
    Dan North 
    Kicking the complexity habit 
  • 10:10 - 10:40
    Presentation
    Kevin Behr 
    "First In Last Out" – Devops and its roots in coal mining. 
  • Break 
     
  • 11:10 - 11:40
    Presentation
    Andrea Provaglio  
    Overcoming Self-organization Blocks 
  • 11:50 - 12:20
    Presentation
    Rachel Davies & Aimy Ko 
    XP at Unruly 
  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Presentation
    Markus Andrezak 
    Lean Product is about the people - Putting it all together 
  • Lunch 
     
  • 14:00 - 14:30
    Presentation
    Matt Wynne 
    Communication Hacks 
  • 14:40 - 15:10
    Presentation
    Stuart Leitch 
    Surviving / Scaling at Skyscanner 
  • 15:20 - 15:50
    Presentation
    Liz Keogh 
    Capability Red: Requirements at Scale 
  • Break 
     
  • 16:20 - 17:20
    Keynote
    Jabe Bloom 
    Decisions and Futures: On Designing Boundaries, Systems, and Distributed Cognition 
  • 17:20 - 19:00
     
    Drinks reception/Fishbowl Session 
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Track 2

Goldratt Room

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  • 11:10 - 13:00
    Workshop
    Karl Scotland 
    Build a Learning Organisation the Kanban Way 
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  • 14:00 - 15:50
    Workshop
    Kim Ballestrin, Jabe Bloom & Torbjörn Gyllebring 
    Better Decision Making: Gathering Data and Mapping Decisions  
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Track 3

Drucker Room

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  • 10:10 - 10:40
    Presentation
    Ceri Shaw 
    Join the Dark Side - why developers should choose management 
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  • 11:10 - 11:40
    Presentation
    Marc Burgauer 
    "What's the worst that can happen?" - How authentic connection enables change and innovation 
  • 11:50 - 12:20
    Presentation
    Gitte Klitgaard 
    Stress and depression – a taboo in our time - how love for your work can hurt you 
  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Presentation
    Kevin Austin 
    The Pursuit Of Better – The Story So Far 
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  • 14:00 - 15:50
    Workshop
    Bill Beard 
    Lean Branding: Developing Powerful Brands in Lean Environments 
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Track 4

Meadows Room

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  • 11:10 - 13:00
    Workshop
    Ian Carroll 
    Lean Estimation & Planning 
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  • 14:00 - 15:50
    Workshop
    Håkan Forss & Martin Burns 
    Building the Boardwalk Empire: Gemba Management in Action 
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Track 1

Deming Room

  • 9:00 - 10:00
    Keynote
    Esther Derby 
    Still No Silver Bullets 
  • 10:10 - 10:40
    Presentation
    Bob Marshall 
    Theories of Change 
  • Break 
     
  • 11:10 - 11:40
    Presentation
    Martin Burns 
    Independence, Devo-Max and Centralisation: Power Structures in Delivery Organisations 
  • 11:50 - 12:20
    Presentation
    Will Evans 
    Exploration & Exploitation Mindsets in Design-Driven Enterprises 
  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Presentation
    Clarke Ching 
    Learn Lean from Fast Fashion - why Zara clothing should be your Agile/Lean role model 
  • Lunch 
     
  • 14:00 - 14:30
    Presentation
    Sandro Mancuso 
    Crafted Design 
  • 14:40 - 15:10
    Presentation
    Seb Rose 
    So long, and thanks for all the tests. 
  • 15:20 - 15:50
    Presentation
    Torbjörn Gyllebring 
    The Reverse Conway - organizational hacking for techies 
  • Break 
     
  • 16:20 - 17:20
    Keynote
    J. B. Rainsberger 
    The Next Decade of Agile Software Development 
  • Chris McDermott 
    Closing 

Track 2

Goldratt Room

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  • 11:10 - 13:00
    Workshop
    Mike Burrows 
    STATIK, Kanban's hidden gem 
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  • 14:00 - 15:50
    Workshop
    Adam Yuret 
    Introduction to value stream mapping 
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Track 3

Drucker Room

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  • 10:10 - 10:40
    Presentation
    Naveed Khawaja 
    Never under-estimate the power of change agents 
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  • 11:10 - 11:40
    Presentation
    Katherine Kirk 
    Navigating Politics in Agile/Lean Initiatives 
  • 11:50 - 12:20
    Presentation
    Allan Kelly 
    Beyond Projects - transforming the model of IT work 
  • 12:30 - 13:00
    Presentation
    Dimitar Bakardzhiev 
    #NoEstimates Project Planning using Monte Carlo simulation 
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  • 14:00 - 14:30
    Presentation
    Sami Honkonen 
    Trying to change company culture is a fool’s errand 
  • 14:40 - 15:10
    Presentation
    Greg Brougham 
    Cynefin & Lean Startup 
  • 15:20 - 15:50
    Presentation
    Lauren Gilchrist 
    5 Ways to Outsmart Your Brain and Make Better Product Decisions 
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Track 4

Meadows Room

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  • 11:10 - 13:00
    Workshop
    Angela Harms 
    Nonviolent Communication 
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  • 14:00 - 15:50
    Workshop
    Melissa Perri 
    Designing to Learn: Creating Successful MVPs in Agile Teams 
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7:30 - 08:50
Adam Yuret
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Lean Coffee
8:50 - 09:00
Chris McDermott
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Welcome
9:00 - 10:00
Dan North
  (Keynote)
Kicking the complexity habit
Without rigorous care and attention software quickly becomes messy and unmanageable. Even with the best intentions entropy and complexity are a fact of life in growing applications. As in many other contexts it is easier to tackle the symptoms than the cause. Systems Thinking calls this behaviour "Shifting the Burden" and it is more widespread than you might think. From your IDE to your automated build, from DDD’s ACLs to TDD and other TLAs, from backlogs to burn-ups, we are surrounded by props for coping with complexity. As appealing as these are, they also make us less likely to address the underlying problem of complexity itself. Dan believes you can learn to recognise these coping mechanisms for what they are, and intends to set you on the path to simplicating your programming life.
10:10 - 10:40
Kevin Behr
  (Presentation)
"First In Last Out" – Devops and its roots in coal mining.
Like a child prodigy nearly every technical discipline has taken credit for some roll in developing what we call modern day Devops. Kevin will share what he found as he  pursued leads that led him to study work performed by sociologists in coal mines during the WWII era. Learn why Devops is really nothing new and what socio-technical-system patterns you can cultivate to make your efforts and collaboration more effective.
Break
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11:10 - 11:40
Andrea Provaglio
  (Presentation)
Overcoming Self-organization Blocks

We know that self-organization is a critical aspect of every successful Agile project and we know that it takes trust, respect, openness and responsibility; so why many teams have a hard time to achieve it?

Self-organization changes the leader/team dynamics and the teammate/teammate ones. Resistance may arise and the source is frequently rooted in mental habits, such as a latent blaming culture, confusing guidance and command, fear of taking responsibility or losing status, unconscious personal agendas.

Attend this session to learn how to deal with organizational issues such as:

* Creating team’s cohesion; counteracting division

* Positioning yourself at your proper guidance level

* Identifying a latent blaming culture and mitigate its consequences

* Understanding the manager’s and team’s roadblocks to self-organization

* Making your team collaborate more smoothly


11:50 - 12:20
Rachel Davies & Aimy Ko
  (Presentation)
XP at Unruly

Unruly is the leading global platform for social video marketing. Founded in 2006, we now have 12 offices and employ over 150 people globally. We've been applying eXtreme Programming (XP) from the start and that's still a core part of how we develop our software products. As our company and customer base has grown, we've had to figure out how to shape user stories and make plans with stakeholders spread across US, Europe and Asia. We also have grown our tech team so we can continue to develop new product offerings with rich user-experience while improving our underlying infrastructure to handle a growing amount of traffic and data. Come to this session to hear about how we use XP and where we've had to make adjustments to adapt to scale while remaining as Lean as possible.

12:30 - 13:00
Markus Andrezak
  (Presentation)
Lean Product is about the people - Putting it all together

Since the meaning of Lean also gets fuzzier as we go to the fuzzy front end of product development, to the work of defining products, I was struggling with what principles of Lean to apply. "Eliminate waste" does not work here, as in discovery processes is not clear upfront what waste is. "Eliminate waiting time" also does not work: For depth you need waiting time. So, I tried to grab hold onto the probably most abstract and fuzzy of all Lean principles but also probably the one holding it all together and the one making up for the difference between Mean Lean and Real Lean: Respect for people.

In the talk I compile what we derived from this principle in our work at early stages of product definition and how this helps us to support companies in defining and changing successful products.

I will talk on how we get to 

  • find the right Jobs to be done for the customer
  • How to define them, and then 
  • how to build them

The talk will be a journey from ethnographical Interviews, over identifying core needs, discovering jobs to be done, getting closer to solutions and finally defining and building the product. Concepts mentioned will be

  • Ten types of innovation,
  • Jobs to be done
  • Idealized design
  • Design Thinking
  • Non linearity of processes and the involved cultural conflicts
  • the issue of bias in research and how to cope with them
  • different types of research in different contexts and phases of work

This is a compilation of understanding a different type of work and which conclusions we made from that understanding in our work at überproduct. 

Lunch
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14:00 - 14:30
Matt Wynne
  (Presentation)
Communication Hacks

Communication is the key skill that makes agile work. But that involves people, and it’s complicated. This talk is a tour of some new ways to help you think about communication. You’ll learn the non-violent communication model, ideas from cognitive-behaviour therapy, and how to give feedback without feeding anyone a shit sandwich.

14:40 - 15:10
Stuart Leitch
  (Presentation)
Surviving / Scaling at Skyscanner

Skyscanner is Scotland's Internet tech titan.  After a decade in the Flight meta-search business annual revenues stands at $100m and company valuation is sky-rocketing.  Recent growth in headcount has been well publicised and presents a highly positive image of this Scottish success story.

Growing a software business from 100 to 500 employees is hard.  Doing it in 2 years is exceptionally difficult.  This presentation will offer an insight into the challenges faced while building a software development team during hypergrowth.  Rather than focus on the end state (or current state), I'll talk through the evolutionary process that has seen Skyscanner move from projects to programmes to squads and beyond. I'll share the pain we faced at each stage and explain what provoked us to move to another organisational model.  I'll also cover the cultural and organisational challenges we've faced in migrating from a single monolithic 6 weekly release to many components releasing daily.

As a start up at scale we seek to provide a great place to work for our employees and a great product for our users to interact with.  The pressures of scaling frequently impact on those objectives, which may be why so many internet businesses fail to achieve stability at scale.

15:20 - 15:50
Liz Keogh
  (Presentation)
Capability Red: Requirements at Scale

We know that in a complex environment, breaking everything down into tiny little parts doesn't work. We always make discoveries, no matter how much analysis we do! So how can we define the problem usefully enough to prioritise, plan and get started, and where do we start?

In this talk, we'll look at the idea of capabilities as a way of breaking down requirements without going into too much detail. Combining this with complexity estimation, we allow for easy planning and dependency management, prioritisation both across the portfolio and within a project, and a robust risk- and value-driven approach that also happens to play nicely with Scrum, Kanban and BDD!

Break
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16:20 - 17:20
Jabe Bloom
  (Keynote)
Decisions and Futures: On Designing Boundaries, Systems, and Distributed Cognition

Software Design and Engineering remain constrained by mismatched management models and precepts, rooted in antiquated conceptions of physical and mental work.  As cycle times accelerate and abstractions encapsulate knowledge, we must begin to reconceive how management can evolve to become more effective and productive, beyond current notions of oversight, control, assessment, and impediment removal.

How is it that we can relate our intentions and actions to an uncertain, rapidly changing set of potential futures? How can we resolve our issues with the problems inherent in expertise and functional alignment, so that we can improve flow of information and value through our businesses?

Jabe Bloom will discuss modelling human systems that produce and consume knowledge, to enable distributed cognition, leading towards better decisions and intentional futures.

17:20 - 19:00
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Drinks reception/Fishbowl Session
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11:10 - 13:00
Karl Scotland
  (Workshop)
Build a Learning Organisation the Kanban Way

In a world of Big Bang Disruption, the need for learning organisations is greater than ever. Businesses need to develop people to be able to continuously solve problems as well as implement solutions. This workshop will introduce a canvas that can be used to apply Kanban Thinking. Participants will work through the canvas, learning how the different parts can help towards enabling continuous improvement.

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14:00 - 15:50
Kim Ballestrin, Jabe Bloom & Torbjörn Gyllebring
  (Workshop)
Better Decision Making: Gathering Data and Mapping Decisions

This workshop will use activities to demonstrate useful tools and insights related to decision making.

  1. How information can change over time and thus it's relative usefulness or uselessness for decision making.

  2. A useful technique to visualise decisions, their relationships and the information needed to make them.

Learning outcomes

  • How to facilitate decision making with individuals and groups

  • How to clarify your own decisions and their relationships so that gathering the information to make decisions is easier

  • Insights about decision making from three practitioners working across the world in different types of workplaces

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10:10 - 10:40
Ceri Shaw
  (Presentation)
Join the Dark Side - why developers should choose management

‘Management’ is seen as a bit of a dirty word in the development community, but it doesn’t have to mean PHB’s and David Brent, and the way to make sure of that is to take on the mantle yourself. Being prepared to take on management responsibilities can help you to push the agility of your organisation and help your company to stay Lean. 

In this talk I'll aim to convince you that management isn't all that different from development - it's all just problem solving in the end. I’ll cover a bit about what’s involved with line management and “project management" in an agile environment, why you might find it interesting and what resources are out there to help if you do decide to join the dark side.

I've been working in development for over 10 years ... 4 years ago I'd have said your were crazy if you'd suggested I become a manager, but I've now been doing line and project management for 3 years whilst still contributing features to the projects I work on.

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11:10 - 11:40
Marc Burgauer
  (Presentation)
"What's the worst that can happen?" - How authentic connection enables change and innovation

Trust is the metric that best reflects the quality of our relationships and of our social connections. "The more interconnected a system is, the more robust and resilient it will be", finds philosopher, Alicia Juarrero. Trust is a metric for social resilience. 

Political Scientist, Francis Fukuyama, finds trust to be the pivotal attribute of a successful culture. Trust culture enables societies to leap forward, while distrust results in decline. 

We reliably find the absence of trust is the cause for teams failing to adopt agile or lean practices successfully. How can trust be developed to support successful adoption?

We're physically hardwired for connection. Rejection hurts. We get meaning and validation where connection allows us to be authentic and vulnerable. Yet we exist in environments that routinely inform us, that what we do and who we are, is not "Good Enough". We are shamed into conformity (often masqueraded as improvement) and blamed for failures. 

"The secret killer of innovation is shame. You can’t measure it, but it is there. Every time someone holds back on a new idea, fails to give their manager much needed feedback, and is afraid to speak up in front of a client, you can be sure shame played a part. [...] Shame becomes fear. Fear leads to risk aversion. Risk aversion kills innovation" explains Peter Shearan, from his experience working with companies like Apple and IBM, enabling large-scale behavioural change.

Vulnerability is considered a weakness, instead of a required condition for innovation. Being risk-averse means we construct change so it is failsafe, looking for a safe path that invariably leads us to imitation and consequent failure.

"Management, in most of its incarnations, is an institutionalized form of distrust" say Robert Solomon and Fernando Flores.  

This talk presents the answers I have found: about how we can remain authentic in a blame culture; how we can build authentic trust and enable safe-to-fail environments to strengthen our connections, as well as my own experience applying these practices.

11:50 - 12:20
Gitte Klitgaard
  (Presentation)
Stress and depression – a taboo in our time - how love for your work can hurt you

Stress and stress-induced depression hit many knowledge workers, and yet it is still a taboo.

“I am stressed” has become something we hear everyday, and it has almost become prestigious to say so; it shows that we are busy, important people. On the other hand it is a bit embarrassing to be really stressed and not being able to handle it

The sad thing is that when it comes to the people, who are really stressed, we don’t hear it.

We do not see it; we do not talk about it.

We feel awkward when people are stressed or come back from sick leave. We try not to talk about it. It is so much easier with a broken leg; we can carry stuff for them, hold the door, get coffee etc., but what do we do with a person with stress?

I have been sick with stress and it took nine months to come back. It was the second time and it had to hit me hard before I took it seriously.

I believe strongly in taking openly about stress and depression. It is the only way we can learn from it; the way we can make it okay to say “I need help?”.

In this talk I will discuss the taboo and explore why it hits knowledge workers so often, as well as come with tips and trick to prevent it.

 
12:30 - 13:00
Kevin Austin
  (Presentation)
The Pursuit Of Better – The Story So Far

This talk explores the first-hand experiences of the actions and impacts of a ground-up transition, based on a real-life example originating at J.P. Morgan’s Glasgow office.  We will look at why the firm got started on the initiative, the problems it sought to address, how we overcame resistance, what worked well, and an unexpected outcome of what happened when we thought things were starting to go wrong.

Additionally, we will look at the differences that top-down support made to an entire line of business, and how to invest in people and better ways of working on an on-going basis.

A key theme that we will discuss is the impact of ‘Lean Agile Glasgow’ and ‘Lean Agile Scotland’ on J.P. Morgan’s working culture in Glasgow, and how the bank is now supporting similar practices across J.P. Morgan locations in the US, UK and India.

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14:00 - 15:50
Bill Beard
  (Workshop)
Lean Branding: Developing Powerful Brands in Lean Environments

In a LeanUX world, where we’re living Build, Measure, Learn and rapidly deploying MVPs, branding is in danger of becoming an afterthought. While much attention has been spent on research, sketching, and constantly testing, not much has been spent on branding and how you communicate value and resonate with customers. That’s a risky proposition in crowded marketplaces where differentiation is essential and customer loyalty is harder than ever to achieve. After all, those are two of the core goals of branding.

In this workshop, we’ll use activities and presentations to learn and discuss:

- The basics of Lean Branding

- Why people are drawn to certain brands - and how to make them love yours 

- How to find the meaning behind your brand

- How to capture your product and company’s personality through experimentation

- How to implement and build your brand through your UX while staying true to Lean

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11:10 - 13:00
Ian Carroll
  (Workshop)
Lean Estimation & Planning

How long will it take? How much will it cost? 

The two questions that constantly haunt development teams. This session is in two parts. Part one is how to estimate before the project has even started - normally in the context of when you're building the business case to secure funding for the project to proceed. Part two then covers the detail of how to size, estimate, plan, and track progress once funding has been secured and the project has started. This is an instructor led hands-on workshop where attendees will work out how much a phantom project will cost and when it will be complete. 

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14:00 - 15:50
Håkan Forss & Martin Burns
  (Workshop)
Building the Boardwalk Empire: Gemba Management in Action

Knowledge work has a fundamental problem: it is invisible. Flow of value is hidden in documents, systems and people's heads. Improving and unblocking the flow relies on making the invisible visible to individuals and accessible to their inspection and interactions.

In this roleplaying taster workshop, you will experience 

1) The power of visual management at the workplace to enable more effective team-management dialogue.

2) Behaviour patterns that build a learning culture to better meet team, management and organisational needs.

The workshop will go beyond simple information flow to building better behaviours to act on the information. You will engage in active coaching dialogues and take part in continuous improvement processes.

You might also pick up a few visual management nuggets that you find helpful.

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9:00 - 10:00
Esther Derby
  (Keynote)
Still No Silver Bullets

The term “best practices” is alluring. Best practices promise that if you just do these things, all will be well. But what works at another company may not work for you. Copying what worked else where may not achieve the results you want, and may not help at all. 

You /can/ learn from what other companies do. But in the end, what matters is how well you are satisfying your customers, employees, and stakeholders. And that requires a unique approach based on your unique business model, culture, and value proposition. In this talk, I'll explore the lure of silver bullets. I'll outline when looking for a best practices makes sense, and when it doesn't. I'll offer guidelines--based on my experience and research--to help you discern when to adapt a practice to your environment, and when to adapt your environment to take advantage of a practice invented by someone else. And I'll share ideas on how you can innovate a path that reflects your unique situation. 

10:10 - 10:40
Bob Marshall
  (Presentation)
Theories of Change

Many knowledge-work organisations struggle with how to "get folks to do what the organisation wants". Research and experience both show that this frame leads inevitably to "failure". This session will afford everyone the opportunity to look into the question together - and to explore alternative frames which might lead to more hopeful outcomes.

Break
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11:10 - 11:40
Martin Burns
  (Presentation)
Independence, Devo-Max and Centralisation: Power Structures in Delivery Organisations

A hugely interesting outcome of the Independence Referendum has been the growth in interest in questions that previously only attracted political geeks of the wide staring eyed variety.

The rise in political interest has allowed us to reimagine what kind of country should Scotland be, and how closely should it be adapted to its context, and a conscious seeking of models that might serve as inspiration to what Scotland could be, regardless of the referendum outcome.

  • How should society be structured?
  • What aims should we pursue?
  • How is power legitimised?
  • How is policy developed and implemented?
  • To what extent are models developed for other contexts ada

And above all

  • Where should sovereignty be located?

Similarly, the growth of Agile has significantly raised the awareness of current state in delivery organisations, and along with a deep seated urge for ’better’ an outward quest to find heuristics that might support greater insight and better practise in our organisations.

How well can models developed for other contexts be applied to ours?

11:50 - 12:20
Will Evans
  (Presentation)
Exploration & Exploitation Mindsets in Design-Driven Enterprises

Most larger organizations are able to scale and survive in the medium and long term by achieving operational excellence in driving out waste and exploiting their existing business model. The mindsets, mental models, and methods for achieving this success at scale make organizational systems fragile and susceptible to disruptive innovation. Even organizations that embrace the value of design to deliver better customer experiences are susceptible to epistemic failure. 

What are the required strategic horizons, mindsets, and methods required to balance the exploitation of existing business models in context with exploring new and potentially disruptive value propositions? How can can teams collaborate at the fuzzy front-end of exploration to generate insights and explore the complex domain using design thinking? What are the portfolio concerns for managing both exploitative and exploratory strategies for continued survival and growth? How can balanced teams start where they are and iterate towards more resilient and adaptive structures to continuously improve offerings and deliver value to customers? 


12:30 - 13:00
Clarke Ching
  (Presentation)
Learn Lean from Fast Fashion - why Zara clothing should be your Agile/Lean role model

One of my Agile heroes is Amancio Ortega, founder of the Zara clothing company and the world's third richest man.  I use the manufacturing and retailing mechanism Ortega created, while growing Zara from 1 Spanish store in 1975 to over 2,000 worldwide today,  as my role model for Lean and Agile software development.  

Very little is known about Ortega  - Google him and you'll find just a few articles, a couple of pictures, and a very short wikipedia page.  One of those articles - "Rapid-Fire Fulfilment" from the November 2004 edition of Harvard Business Review - though, reveals how Ortega "turned the rules of supply chain management on their head" by abandoning long-range forecasts and tightly coupling their product development, manufacturing and retailing processes.  

Put more simply: Zara develop and manufacture small batches of their new products, try to sell them in their stores, abandon those that sell poorly, and mass produce those that sell well.  They judge success by the ringing of their cash registers.  Doesn't that sound a lot like the Lean Startup model?

This session won't help you become a retailing giant but it will help you understand how Agile and Lean should operate when we realise that our goal is not just to build software, but to build commercially successful products and solutions.

Lunch
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14:00 - 14:30
Sandro Mancuso
  (Presentation)
Crafted Design

How can we quickly tell what an application is about? How can we quickly tell what it does? How can we distinguish business concepts from architecture clutter? How can we quickly find the code we want to change? How can we instinctively know where to add code for new features? Purely looking at unit tests is either not possible or too painful. Looking at higher-level tests can take a long time and still not give us the answers we need. For years, we have all struggled to design and structure projects that reflect the business domain. 

In this talk Sandro will be sharing how he designed the last application he worked on, twisting a few concepts from Domain-Driven Design, properly applying MVC, borrowing concepts from CQRS, and structuring packages in non-conventional ways. Sandro will also be touching on SOLID principles, Agile incremental design, modularisation, and testing strategies. By iteratively modifying the project structure to better model the product requirements, he has come up with a design style that helps developers create maintainable and domain-oriented software.

14:40 - 15:10
Seb Rose
  (Presentation)
So long, and thanks for all the tests.

Software development is hard. Unit testing and Test Driven Development (TDD) can make it easier, but only if done well - and that takes time. In this session we will cover:

- HOW these practices can help your project,

- WHAT you can do to get better at them and

- WHY your boss should care.

You’ll learn about project risk and how developer testing can improve the chances of a successful delivery. You’ll see how developer tests don’t just protect against regression, but also act as a primary source of documentation. And we’ll take a few hints from the ancient Egyptians!

You might have heard people say:

- “Tests make it hard to refactor.”

- “The customer doesn’t care how many tests there are.”

- “If we had to work the way the agile gurus tell us, nothing would ever get done.”

If you’ve ever struggled to respond to these challenges, then this session is for you.

A note about the title: In Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy the dolphins leave planet earth before it gets destroyed, with their last enigmatic message “So long, and thanks for all the fish” being misinterpreted. Is our software giving us the same message? After all, the software would still perform the same function without the tests, wouldn’t it?

15:20 - 15:50
Torbjörn Gyllebring
  (Presentation)
The Reverse Conway - organizational hacking for techies

Here we'll explore the relationship between technology/architechture and organizational design. Looking at how they're codependent, co-evolutionary and bidirectionally influences each other. Well explore how the architect is a social agent and how management shapes software.

Break
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16:20 - 17:20
J. B. Rainsberger
  (Keynote)
The Next Decade of Agile Software Development

In 2011, I looked back at over a decade of progress in the community of Agile software development practitioners. I talked about some alarming trends in our attitudes, our practices and what we teach, but also described the ways in which I believe we’d really advanced the art of software development. Now, I explore a more interesting question: Where do we go from here? Those alarming trends haven’t all gone away. In fact, some have got worse, and I want to highlight some of things that I think we really need to stop before they destroy all the credibility we’ve built. Of course, the picture is not bleak: we’ve helped make software development better for so many people, and I’ll talk about where I’d like us to focus our considerable energy to help make the coming decade even better for our field and the lives of our colleagues. 

Chris McDermott
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11:10 - 13:00
Mike Burrows
  (Workshop)
STATIK, Kanban's hidden gem

In this extended session we explore STATIK, a tool well used and evolved over the years, but not often described! At its most basic, it is a repeatable way to implement kanban systems. More interestingly, it is a way to generate and structure improvements to existing systems, to reinvigorate ad-hoc implementations, and a way to reconnect with organisational concerns such as purpose, scope, and agreement.

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14:00 - 15:50
Adam Yuret
  (Workshop)
Introduction to value stream mapping

How much of your team's time is taken up scrambling to resolve engineering escalations? Does Marketing or the executive staff drop work on your team's head at the last minute? How do you communicate the importance of managing these competing priorities? Value-stream mapping may just be an answer.

A Value Stream Map is a visual representation of the steps required to complete work. It sounds scary, and traditional approaches can be mind numbing. We've modified this process to be lightweight and to encourage understanding and collaboration across departments and teams.

In this workshop Adam Yuret will provide an brief introduction to the general concepts of flow-efficiency and queuing theory. We’ll explain why these are a problem in most organizations and then introduce the mechanics of value-stream mapping. Next, we will lead the group in an actual value-stream mapping exercise consisting of mapping rounds of the pizza game interactive workshop. 

Once we have practiced creating a Value Stream we will review the practical requirement for running a VSM Workshop in your business including:

- Who you should invite to a VSM

- Example Timing and Schedules for a workshop

- What to do with the VSM after a successful workshop

When we’re finished we’ll run a brief lean coffee style debrief of the experience.

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10:10 - 10:40
Naveed Khawaja
  (Presentation)
Never under-estimate the power of change agents

When it comes to agile and lean transformation, half the battle is making sure you have the right change agents in place. Assess their competencies, behavioral styles, and values with an eye for some key indicators. 

Effective change agents demonstrate flexibility and resilience; recognize growth opportunities; strive for results; lead courageously; and gain buy-in. 

We will explore the attributes, go through real world stories and personal case studies to explore this challenge and how to overcome the barriers to change.

If your organization is facing a transition - this will be a perfect session for you to recognize, rethink and respond to potential challenges and how to prevent them.

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11:10 - 11:40
Katherine Kirk
  (Presentation)
Navigating Politics in Agile/Lean Initiatives

Have you ever wondered why, when you’ve finally got Agile/Lean working nicely in your software engineering team, managers or ‘outsiders’ can come in and create politics ‘un-necessarily’, despite your best efforts? Have you ever sat there in meetings frustrated and exasperated at the seemingly unnecessary dramatics some participants go through?
 
 Or, when you start an Agile/Lean initiative, the surrounding politics in the company sometimes escalate rather than decrease? Or perhaps you are struggling with some internal team members who just can’t seem to drop the politics and adapt to ‘this different way of working’….
 
 What’s going on? Why doesn't pure data, logic, transparency and collaboration always work?
 
 In order to explore new insights as to why this happens and what we can do about it, in this talk, Katherine draws on eastern and tribal philosophy to ‘kick off’ different thinking and find practical and realistic ways that deal positively with destructive politics and/or prevent scenarios like these from even happening in the first place.   

11:50 - 12:20
Allan Kelly
  (Presentation)
Beyond Projects - transforming the model of IT work

Good projects make bad software.  At best the concept of a "Project" is erroneously used for IT - specifically development work.  At worst the Project model leads to expensive dead software, higher costs and missed business opportunities. 

It is time to move beyond the project model: today the business is the software. IT is not some optional service any longer, seeing IT as costs cutting misses the point, IT os about growth, business growth, IT is the business.  Projects end, companies don't (we hope).

Application development and enhancement isn't some once in a while project. If IT doesn't deliver benefit the business isn't moving forward.  Application development is business as usual and business as usual isn't a dirty word.

In this talk Allan Kelly will attempt to justify this somewhat radical view: he will examine the project model and show how it does not match application development and he will show how harnessing IT for growth means harnessing a different model of application development.  He will then outline an alternative to the project model and what companies need to do to achieve it.  And he will attempt to say all this inside 45 minutes!


12:30 - 13:00
Dimitar Bakardzhiev
  (Presentation)
#NoEstimates Project Planning using Monte Carlo simulation

Clients come to us with an idea for a product and they always ask the questions - how long will it take and how much will it cost us to deliver? They need a delivery date and a budget estimate.

I will show how to use Monte Carlo simulation for predicting the delivery time for your next project.

I will go pretty quickly through the slides and focus on how to simulate project delivery time using Monte Carlo simulation in MS Excel.

The method presented can be used by any team that uses user stories for planning and tracking project execution no matter the development process used (Scrum, XP, kanban systems).

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14:00 - 14:30
Sami Honkonen
  (Presentation)
Trying to change company culture is a fool’s errand

Culture is an end result, much like cake. A cake is an end result of the recipe. To make great cake we don’t fix the finished cake, we fix the recipe. As a result we get better cake. Similarly, there’s a recipe for company culture and that recipe will, given enough time, overwrite all other attempts to change culture.

What is the recipe for company culture? How do I change it? This talk explains a systems thinking approach to company culture. 

14:40 - 15:10
Greg Brougham
  (Presentation)
Cynefin & Lean Startup

Eric Ries Lean Startup ideas have become popular over the last couple of years and are based on the key tenet that you should fail fast to provide learning, but is this viable strategy in all situations? This talk explores the ideas in the context of the Cynefin complexity model and argues that there is value but only within a bounded context.

15:20 - 15:50
Lauren Gilchrist
  (Presentation)
5 Ways to Outsmart Your Brain and Make Better Product Decisions

When we build a product, we make thousands of decisions. We search for patterns, draw conclusions, and act upon limited information. It's all in a day's work.

In this talk, I'll explore the 5 most common cognitive biases and how they mislead our product decisions. These include our tendency to value a user's experience more if it coincides with our own experience (confirmation bias) and our tendency to forget that our users are not experts (curse of knowledge). 

You’ll walk out of this talk with ways to identify when your cognitive bias is creeping into your decisions, as well as tips and tricks on how to outsmart your brain and make better product decisions.

This talk is relevant for designers, product managers, developers, founders, managers, and anyone else who finds themselves making product decisions every day.

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11:10 - 13:00
Angela Harms
  (Workshop)
Nonviolent Communication

Nonviolent Communication emerged about 30 years ago as a way to help people create collaboration and mutual understanding. Through a combination of internal awareness and attention to communication, it provides ways to process conflict, and bring more authenticity and connection to our work.  

In this workshop, you'll learn how to listen to what's happening inside yourself, and how to better hear what's going on with the person you're working will. You'll discover some new ways to understand behaviors, and new avenues for talking about change.

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14:00 - 15:50
Melissa Perri
  (Workshop)
Designing to Learn: Creating Successful MVPs in Agile Teams

Using Minimum Viable Products to validate product ideas before building can save companies months of development time and thousands of dollars. The goal of an MVP is to maximize learning, but many people see an MVP as a mininum feature set. MVPs are not reckless, broken products, but rather a way for you to test your assumptions quickly and cheaply. Teams who implement Minimum Viable Products (MVPs) learn more about customers, waste less time, and deliver usable solutions faster.

In this session, we'll focus on the fundamentals of creating an effective MVP experiment: defining effective problem and customer hypotheses, listing your assumptions and picking the riskiest one, and determining which experiment to run. We'll discuss the differences between Lean MVPs and Agile MVPs , and the pros and cons to each.

This talk is geared towards developers, scrum masters, UX designers, and product managers.

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